Ciliate news

Aug
08

Teuthophrys trisulca trisulca

Posted by sonntag

Teuthophrys trisulca trisulca lives in a mutualistic relationship with green algal symbionts. This relatively large – up to 0.3 mm – ciliate catches small multicellular organisms (e.g., rotifers) as food. Teuthophrys trisulca trisulca can be found in lake plankton.

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Jan
29

Coleps hirtus hirtus

Posted by sonntag

From a morphologic point of view, two subspecies of Coleps hirtus are found in lake plankton: Coleps hirtus viridis and Coleps hirtus hirtus. As the name of the former suggests, C. hirtus viridis is a ‘green’ species that lives in symbiosis with unicellular algae. The C. hirtus hirtus shown here does not posess algal symbionts and […]

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Apr
27

Rhabdoaskenasia minima

Posted by sonntag

Rhabdoaskenasia minima is a small (30 x 20 µm) planktonic ciliate commonly found in lakes. This ciliate contains three characteristic ciliary girdles in the anterior half of the cell: one having relatively short cilia, another one with longer cilia that are typically bent posterior and a third girdle with long bristles that faciliate floating in […]

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Apr
27

Coleps nolandi

Posted by sonntag

Coleps nolandi is a ciliate covered by calcified armored plates. The main plates bear species-specific ‘windows’ which have a reniform shape in C. nolandi (see picture below). The ciliate is found in benthic and pelagic freshwater habitats and feeds on algae, other ciliates and organic debris.

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Nov
05

Stentor amethystinus

Posted by sonntag

Stentor amethystinus is a trumpet-shaped ciliate with a violet to purple appearance.  The ciliate is almost 1 mm long and common in lake and pond plankton. Inside the ciliate unicellular algae (the globular green cells) live in symbiosis with S. amethystinus. Stentor is the Unicellular Eukaryote of the Year 2014. This population was sampled by Samuel […]

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Oct
13

Epistylis procumbens

Posted by sonntag

Epistylis procumbens (Video) is a colony-forming ciliate thriving in lake plankton. Individuals feed on bacteria and smaller other protists. Contribution from Harald Bernhard, Philipp Stüber and Daniel Feldbacher who investigated the ciliates from Mondsee during a practical summer course.  

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Aug
06

Paramecium caudatum

Posted by sonntag

Bacteria of the genus Holospora (H. elegans, arrows) colonize the micronucleus (MI) of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum (‘endonuclear symbionts’). The bacteria actively invade the ciliate and the nucleus and are also given to the daughter cell during division. Some bacteria are also released to the environment to infect new hosts. The macronucleus is also visible […]

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Jun
12
Paramecium bursaria

Paramecium bursaria

Posted by sonntag

Paramecium bursaria (Video) is a model ciliate in protist science that lives in symbiosis with algae (green). Here, we see the characteristic two contractile vacuoles with the collecting channels, the cell mouth (slit-like depression with many moving cilia in the middle of the cell) and the macronucleus (appears ellipsoidal in grey).

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Jun
12

Vorticella chlorellata

Posted by sonntag

Individuals of Vorticella chlorellata posess a stalk with which they are attached to other plankton or debris. In this combination they are too large to be ingested by predators. The symbiotic algae (green) provide photosynthetic products to the ciliates and are able to synthesize UV sunscreen compounds (MAAs).

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Jun
12

Pelagostrombidium fallax

Posted by sonntag

Pelagostrombidium fallax feeds on planktonic algae and digests everything but the chloroplast (=’stolen chloroplast’ or ‘kleptoplast’). From the kleptoplasts (photosynthesis), the ciliate receives additional nutrients.

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